The Road to Ramata's Smile

Patient Stories
Posted 5/12/2017

Photo: Margherita Mirabella

Editor's Note: As we celebrate Mother's Day, we wanted to share one of our favorite stories that exemplifies the unwavering love and commitment women show to the children they raise each and every day. Mariana of Ghana is one of the many mothers we have met over the years who did just that to ensure a happy, healthy life for her daughter, Ramata, who was born with a cleft lip and cleft palate. We wish you all a happy Mother's Day from all of us at Operation Smile!

While Ghana offers some of Africa’s most beautiful landscapes, from lush rainforests to tropical beaches, it also suffers from a critical lack of adequate infrastructure, health care services and economic opportunities, resulting in some of the world’s most significant barriers to safe surgical care for its citizens.

It also means rough roads lead from the rural community of Assin Praso to the historic city of Cape Coast.

Though the physical condition of the highways is the same for all who travel between the two cities, the round trips made by Mariana and her daughter, Ramata, were among the most challenging.

Now 4 years old, Ramata was born with a cleft lip and a cleft palate. Mariana was determined to access safe surgical care to repair her daughter’s condition.

Five times, Mariana raised enough money for bus fare and took Ramata to Cape Coast in search of a free surgical option. Five times, the return trip was made all the rockier by heartbreak.

Each time doctors assessed Ramata’s health, she was either anemic or too underweight to receive safe surgery. Even if she would have been deemed healthy enough for surgery, she had no way of being able to afford its cost of 300 cedi ($75).


Photo: Margherita Mirabella

Disappointed but undeterred, Mariana remained vigilant about finding care for Ramata despite her extremely limited resources — she earns a meager living carrying water containers and gathering firewood for her neighbors. When Mariana met a non-medical volunteer from Operation Smile Ghana who was conducting an awareness campaign in Assin Praso, the lives of the family would change forever.

At first, Mariana didn’t believe that the surgeries Ramata needed would be free when she called Operation Smile Ghana Patient Coordinator Clement Ofosuhemeng to learn more about the organization and its work. He assured Mariana that there would be no cost for any procedures needed to repair Ramata’s cleft condition and that Operation Smile would provide a bus to take patients from the Assin Praso area to the next medical mission in Cape Coast.

After Mariana and Ramata made the three-hour trek back to Cape Coast for the Operation Smile medical mission, yet another roadblock diverted Ramata away from care for a staggering sixth time. Ramata had passed her comprehensive health assessment and was approved for cleft lip surgery when she contracted malaria — a major health scare for the young patient in its own right.


Photo: Margherita Mirabella

Fortunately, Ramata survived her bout with malaria and returned to good health as she and her mother looked forward to the next Operation Smile medical mission in the eastern city of Ho. It would be here that she would receive the life-changing procedure which had proved to be so elusive.

In the months leading up to the Ho medical mission, Ramata started attending kindergarten and immediately developed an affinity for school and learning. She also experienced bullying from some of her classmates while others would stare at her cleft lip and shun her. The teasing and isolation drove Ramata to tears.


Photo: Margherita Mirabella

Mariana also suffered social hardships after Ramata was born. As her family offered little, if any, emotional support, she became the target of insults and blame from some of her neighbors for having birthed a child with a cleft condition. While these words infuriated Mariana, they also hardened her resolve to find a surgical solution for her daughter — to give her the chance to pursue an education without it being derailed by cruel treatment from her peers.

Again, Ramata and Mariana boarded the Operation Smile bus and made the 10-hour trip from Assin Praso to Ho. Again, she was cleared for surgery after her patient health assessment, but this time made it to the operating room without further complications and received surgery to repair her cleft lip.


Photo: Margherita Mirabella

When Mariana saw Ramata for the first time after surgery, she was overjoyed by the fact that her daughter would look like all the other children in their community.

Finally, Ramata truly began her journey toward becoming cleft-free. She returned to Ho twice over the following year to receive procedures at Operation Smile medical missions to repair her cleft palate.


Photo: Margherita Mirabella

Mariana marveled at the care and attention Ramata received during the missions and was amazed by the love and care the volunteers showed the patients and their families. She said that she is happy to share Ramata’s story with everyone she meets and would tell other mothers in her community who give birth to children with cleft conditions about Operation Smile's work in Ghana so they can avoid the anguish and frustration that she experienced in searching exhaustively for safe surgical care for her daughter.


Photo: Margherita Mirabella